Biggenden 2016

Our beautiful Biggenden club was putting together its’ second ride of the season, this time a full card of rides including the 80km main event. It had taken a bit of time to dust Rockybar off but we were keen to get back in the saddle, it would be my first 80km of the year with Koda.

We’d had a private little tragedy of our own only four weeks prior to the ride with the loss of our beautiful little foal, but on the strong advice of friends and our amazing vet, Koda was given some time to recover before being put into work for the rest of the season. She bounced back, I think it was us humans who really suffered from the shock and loss.

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Mizzy all rugged up the night before

As with every ride, we go with a plan – the plan always includes who is riding which horse, in which ride, how fast or slow and at the tail end of the plan is to ignore the plan and ride to what the horse feels on the day. I must say, the girls always do a fabulous job at doing exactly that! For instance, Koda is strong – if she feels strong you know she’s fine, if she’s had enough she will say so very loudly. Sam always feels fresh – but what he thinks he can do and what he can actually do are two different things, so he can be quite a challenging horse as his rider really needs to know when he’s had enough! Mizzy is a lazy little sod, but he’s more than capable of speed if and when he wants to, so nine times out of ten he’s pulling your leg when he seems to be fizzling out! Each of them and the others have their little quirks, and we all do our very best to learn those quirks so we can manage each horse safely.

Most horse sports require a good relationship between a horse and their rider – but few require the level of knowledge that endurance does in order to be successful. And by successful I mean finishing rides with happy healthy horses, no matter the distance, speed or place in the field. Winning is not a priority and management is everything!

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Sam was a bit chilly too!

By the time Biggenden rolled around, I had not finished an 80km since August the previous season and I hadn’t done a quicker-than-novice pace ever, despite having achieved the status of an open rider more than 13 months prior. It was a minor goal for me to just one time ride on or a little quicker, though I had no intention of pushing Koda beyond her limits. Knowing that the track was relatively flat made meeting that goal a little more likely since we train on flat ground at home and we as a group find hillier tracks more challenging. For once I was going into a ride on an Open horse. Adriana too had the same goal of at some point doing a quicker-than-novice ride, but as always with Sam we really needed to play him by ear!

At this ride we had Mizzy and Bec in the 40km, while Kat, Adriana and I were entered in the 80km with Vegas, Sam and Koda. Kat and Vegas had completed their first 80km at Spring Mountain about a month prior to Biggenden so they were still a Novice duo. Bec and Mizzy would use the opportunity to get another ride under their belts before attempting their first 80km at Murrumba later in the year.

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Our plan was set, flexibility was agreed on and we were ready to go. The first leg seemed to breeze by so quickly – it was a fantastic track, perfectly suited to our horses! Mizzy and Bec finished the 40km in 3 hours and 7 minutes having found our friend Bridget on track with her horse Champ. The three of us in the 80km zoomed around in 3 hours and 3 minutes, all vetting through nicely.

We were back on track in no time and before we realised it we were seeing the familiar landmarks that were taking us back to home base. For part of the ride we played cat and mouse with the lovely Junior group from America who would end up taking home the Cullen Cup in competition with our Australian Junior team.

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Bec and Mizzy earned another 40km completion!

As we came under the rail bridge it registered in our minds that we were close to home and, after checking our watches, realised we were going a little too quick for Vegas and Kat to meet their minimum time. It suddenly dawned on Adriana and I that both Koda and Sam were travelling marvelously well and still felt fantastic – our goal of riding a bit quicker for the first time was within reach! So after a quick toss up we collectively decided that we were close enough to home to split up, Adriana and I kept up the pace we were already travelling at while Kat dropped back so that she wouldn’t come in under time.

We jogged along nicely, the horses had sensed home and were keen as beans to get back! I think they had gotten used to our routine of going at a reasonably slow pace so being allowed to pick up a canter so close to base was a pleasant change for them! Koda in particular was bouncing!

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Koda leading out nicely on Leg 2

I just love the photos from the ride. We were only 10 minutes quicker than the allowed novice time, but it felt like a really big achievement for both of us as riders to bring our horses home happy and fit and sound at the end of our first “fast” (haha!) ride. We were really proud of Koda and Sam, though it turned out that the best was yet to come in that area.

Unfortunately we had a vet out with Vegas and a real scare when we realised that she was showing some puffiness around her tendons. It turned out to be farrier related – and that farrier would never again be seen! I always admire how Kat takes everything in her stride, she would be back on track very soon after.

The incident really taught me how critical farriery is for endurance horses and made me all the more determined to find the right one for our horses. It had been more than 8 months since our previous farrier had moved on to other work and we really were struggling to find someone who would work with our particular style of riding – and our particular style of shoe! Blue Pegasos poly shoes have been and will continue to be our shoe of choice. They are completely worth the expense – however finding a farrier in our area who is open minded enough to try them is hard, convincing them that they need to listen to us on how to apply them is even harder…! I know I sound like one of those “know-it-alls” who tell their farrier’s how to do their job, but when it comes to a specialty shoe on a horse that is involved in a high-intensity sport, I’m willing to earn that badge.

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Sam and Adriana flying home off Leg 2!

In 2016 we went through farrier after farrier after farrier in our quest to find “The One”! I missed Stretch and his willingness to learn about the shoes and his skill at applying them. Blue Pegasos shoes have been a god-send. They provide support and protection like no other besides being Australian owned, designed and made! They are worth much more than their weight in gold for us. It would be a little longer before we found the farrier that would come to agree with me on that score – but he was out there!

Blue Pegasos poly shoes are available in several densities to suit different disciplines and horses, whether they be recovering from laminitis or require superior shock-absorption in activities such as show-jumping, dressage, eventing, campdrafting or endurance!

https://bluepegasos.com/

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